Stuart Varney Opinion Piece on Trump and National Day of Prayer

We’ve made a conscious decision to not post as much about politics as we have in the past. The nation is more politically divided than any time in recent memory and maybe in the entire history of our great nation.

President Trump is one of if not the biggest topics when it comes to that division. It seems that people either love him or hate him and there’s not much in between the two.

We consider ourselves Christian Conservatives, so it shouldn’t be a surprise,  that we are supporters of the President. Is he perfect? Who is? Does he say and do things that we wish he didn’t? Absolutely!!!

All that said, many people would laugh when the topic of President Trump and Christian values are used in the same sentence. That’s exactly why we love the opinion piece from Stuart Varney that is below.

When laughing off the President’s faith, let us remind you of the scripture in John 8 that says:

But Jesus bent down and started to write on the ground with his finger. When they kept on questioning him, he straightened up and said to them, “Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” 

 

Stuart Varney: Trump doesn’t wear his religion on his sleeve, National Day of Prayer ceremony was a revelation

Thursday morning, President Trump appeared in the Rose Garden for the National Day of Prayer.  It was anything but a “normal” religious event. It wasn’t a somber, restrained affair. It was a joyous call for unity, at a time when unity is vitally needed. It was a very different spiritual occasion.

For me the “highlight,” if I may call it that, was the appearance of Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein. The president called him to the podium and he told the story of the Poway synagogue shooting where he had faced the killer.

He said, “you need to stand tall, to stand fast, and to do what it takes to change the world.” No pieties there: reality! None of this “our thoughts and prayers are with you.” That’s a platitude. Stand up. Face down hate. That’s what the rabbi said. That struck a chord: Christians, Jews, Muslims, Sikhs, and Hindus: all in the audience, and all understood the importance of what Rabbi Goldstein had said.

We also discovered that this president begins all cabinet meetings with a prayer. We didn’t know that. We’d never been told. Mr. Trump clearly doesn’t wear his religion on his sleeve. I’m not going to make a big deal out of this but we saw a side of the president that most of us didn’t know.

And this is the side of the president the media does not show.

What a shame: the prayer event was extraordinary. And timely, following the slaughter of Muslims in New Zealand, Christians in Sri Lanka, Jews in Pittsburgh and Poway. A call to spiritual unity that was exactly what was needed, and that’s exactly what President Trump delivered.

Adapted from Stuart Varney’s “My Take” monologue for Fox Nation on May 3, 2019.

Read the entire story by clicking this link: https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/stuart-varney-trump-national-day-of-prayer-poway-rabbi

Podcast Guest Announcement – Judge Jeanine Pirro

On social media yesterday, we teased this announcement and even gave a big hint later on when we posted a video of an interview done by Judge Jeanine Pirro with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

That’s right!!!! Next week Pastor Ed Boston will have the privilege of interviewing Judge Jeanine Pirro – author of the new book “Liars, Leakers, and Liberals: The Case Against the Anti-Trump Conspiracy”.

While we will be focusing on the book, most will remember the encounter that Judge Jeanine had with the co-host of The View, Whoopi Goldberg.

Check out this video of her appearance on The View and then her new Opening Statement:

Judge Jeanine’s Bio from her personal website.

Judge Jeanine Pirro is the highly respected District Attorney and County Judge, politician, legal commentator, author, champion of victim’s rights and mother of two. She won a Daytime Emmy for her daily syndicated court show “Judge Pirro.” Currently, Pirro hosts Fox News Channel’s “Justice with Judge Jeanine“.  As a result of her high profile prosecutions and her political career, Pirro is a familiar face to New Yorkers.

Pirro’s notable legal career spans over 30 years.  In 1975, Pirro became an Assistant District Attorney for Westchester County, New York and was the first female to prosecute a murder case there. Prosecuting murder, rape, domestic violence, and other violent felonies, she had a 100% conviction rate and received considerable recognition for her work as a leading advocate for victims of domestic violence, establishing one of the first domestic violence units in the nation.

In 1990, Pirro made history as the first female elected judge to the Westchester County Court bench. 

In 1993, she again made history as the first female elected District Attorney in West Chester County – a county of approximately 1 million people. She was re-elected in 1997 and again in 2001, when she was made the first female president of the New York State District Attorney Association. In 2006, the Republican Party chose her as its candidate for New York State Attorney General.

As District Attorney, Pirro crusaded on behalf of the vulnerable creating new specialized units to investigate and prosecute crimes involving hate and bias, elder abuse, domestic abuse, environmental crime, youth and gang violence, sex crimes, animal abuse, child abuse, and pedophiles on the Internet. Her Internet sting operation netted a 100% conviction rate and served as a model for other local, state and federal initiatives.

Pirro was appointed by three governors to investigate and draft legislation for crime victims. Most notably, the New York State Commission on Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board, which she chaired. As a sought-after speaker, Pirro has lectured throughout the country including at the FBI Academy at Quantico, National District Attorneys Association and the US Army War College, as well as various law schools and colleges nationwide. Pirro has been profiled in several magazines including the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, More Magazine, New York Magazine and was even named as one of the world’s 50 Most Beautiful People by People Magazine.

Pirro is a nationally recognized legal expert appearing on television programs such as “The Today Show “ on NBC, “Good Morning America” on ABC, “The Early Show” on CBS, “60 Minutes,” “48 Hours,” “Nightline,” “Larry King Live,” “The View,” “The O’Reilly Factor,” and other national television shows.

Throughout her tenure with Fox News Channel, Pirro has covered breaking news and has reported live on the Aurora theater massacre shooting, the Casey Anthony trial in Orlando Florida, the Drew Peterson trial in Chicago, Illinois, the Newtown, Connecticut school shooting and the George Zimmerman trial in Orlando, Florida.  Her opening statement – a commentary on political as well as pressing contemporary issues garner millions of ‘hits’. Her strong reasoned opinions, no-nonsense analysis, fearlessness and sense of humor make her a sought after and entertaining speaker.

Pirro is the author of three books, “To Punish and Protect: One DA’s Fight Against a System That Coddles Criminals,” “Sly Fox” and “Clever Fox.” Born in the small upstate New York farming town of Elmira, Pirro graduated from Notre Dame High School in three years, earned a B.A. Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Buffalo, and received her Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from Albany Law School where she was an editor of the law review.

Remembering Those Who Gave The Ultimate Sacrifice

Memorial Day should hold a special place in the hearts of all Americans. This day is about one specific thing. Paying honor to those brave men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our great nation.

Many people understandably pay honor this weekend to all veterans. We have our own special day on November the 11th each year and want to make sure that Memorial Day has its own special meaning.

Below is an article from Fox News written by Jocko Willink who is a Retired Navy SEAL Officer. I agree with every word he wrote, and want to share it with everyone.

May God bless the memory of every brother and sister in arms who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

Ed Boston


Ex-SEAL Jocko Willink: Remember the warriors who made the supreme sacrifice — Don’t waste your time on Earth

I am the fallen soldier, sailor, airman, and Marine.

Remember me.

I am the one that held the line.

Sometimes I volunteered. Sometimes I went because I was told to go.

But when the nation called – I answered.

In order to serve, I left behind the family, friends, and freedom that so many take for granted.

Over time, I used different weapons: a sword, a musket, a bayonet, a rifle, a machine gun.

Often, I marched into battle on foot – countless miles – across whole continents. I had little water and even less food. But it did not matter. We had a job to do.

Other times, I rode to battle on horseback or in wagons; sometimes on trains; later in tanks or Jeeps or Humvees.

In early wars, my ships were made of wood and powered by the wind.

Later they were made of steel and powered by diesel fuel or the atom.

I even took to the air and mastered the sky in planes, helicopters, and jets.

The machines of war evolved and changed with the times.

But remember that it was always me – the warrior – that had to fight our nation’s enemies.

I fought at Lexington and Concord as our nation was born.

I crossed the Delaware on Christmas day in 1776. Freedom was on our side.

I defended The Chattahoochee River in the War of 1812. I would stand again.

In the Civil War, I fought with my brothers – and against my brothers – at Gettysburg and Shiloh and Bull Run. I learned that we must never again divide.

In World War l, I marched on the Marne and held the line at Belleau Wood. The War to end all wars, they called it. I just called it hell.

In World War ll, I fought everywhere: from the beaches of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge, to the sands of Iwo Jima and the hell of Guadalcanal. I stood against tyranny and kept darkness from consuming the world.

In Korea I landed at Inchon and broke out of the Chosin Reservoir. They called it the forgotten war – but I never forgot.

In Vietnam, I went and I fought in the Mekong Delta and at Ia Drang and Khe Sanh and Hamburger Hill. Some say my country waivered. But I did not waiver. Ever.

In the recent past I have fought in Grenada, Panama, Somalia, and other desperate places around the globe.

And finally I have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan. In Baghdad, Fallujah, and Ramadi.

In Kunar, Helmand, and Kandahar.

As technology advanced, I used night vision goggles and global positioning systems and drones and lasers and thermal optics.

But it was still me, a human being, that did the work.

It was me that patrolled up the mountains or across the desert or through the streets.

It was me that suffered in the merciless heat and the bitter cold.

It was me that went out, night after night, to confront our nation’s enemies and confront evil face to face.

It was me.

Remember me. I was a warrior.

But also remember:

That I was not only a warrior.

I was not just a soldier, sailor, airman, or Marine.

Remember also: that I was a son, a brother, a father.

I was a daughter, a sister, a mother.

I was a person – like you – a real person with hopes and dreams for the future.

I wanted to have children.

I wanted to watch my children grow up.

I wanted to see my son score a touchdown or shoot the winning basket.

I wanted to walk my daughter down the aisle.

I wanted to kiss my wife again.

I wanted to grow old with her – and be there to hold her hand when life grew hard.

When I told her I would be with her until the end – I meant it.

When I told my children I would always be there for them – I meant it.

But I gave all that away.

All of it.

On that distant battlefield, on some god-forsaken patch of dirt, amongst the fear and the fire and the bullets.

Or in the sky above enemy territory filled with flak.

Or on the unforgiving sea where we fought against the enemy and against the depths of the abyss.

There, in those awful places: I held the line.

I did not waiver and I did not hesitate.

I: The Soldier, Sailor, Airman, or Marine.

I stood my ground and sacrificed my life – my future, my hopes, my dreams.

I sacrificed everything – for you.

This Memorial Day, remember me: the fallen warrior.

And remember me not for my sake – but for yours.

Remember what I sacrificed so you can truly appreciate the incredible treasures you have: Life. Liberty. The pursuit of happiness.

You have the joys of life, the joys that I gave up, so that you can relish in them:

A cool wind in the air.

The gentle spring grass on your bare feet.

The warm summer sun on your face.

Family. Friends. And freedom.

Never forget where it all came from.

It came from sacrifice: The supreme sacrifice.

Don’t waste it. Don’t waste any of your time on this earth.

Live a life that honors the sacrifice of our fallen heroes.

Remember them always. And make every day… Memorial Day.


 

Jocko Willink is a Retired Navy SEAL Officer, author of “Extreme Ownership,” “Discipline Equals Freedom Field Manual,” and the “Way of the Warrior Kid” series, and hosts the top-rated podcast: Jocko Podcast.