Two Heroes From “The Greatest Generation” George Bush and Bob Dole

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. To me, this pictures speaks volumes of “The Greatest Generation”. While they had been political allies and rivals, it was their service to our country that brings a smile to my face.

This week, with the passing of President George Bush, we have heard quite a bit of information about him flying numerous combat missions and about the time he was shot down by the Japanese, during WW II.

Bob Dole served on the other side of the globe during WW II. He suffered permanent injuries when he was hit by German machine gun fire near Castel d’Aiano in the Apennine mountains southwest of Bologna, Italy.

When I look at the picture above, there are several things that come into my mind.

First is that there is an American patriot and hero laying in State in a coffin covered by a flag that both Bush and Dole sacrificed greatly for.

Next, I see another American patriot and hero being helped to stand out of his wheelchair.

Also, you see a left-handed salute (salutes are to be given with the right hand). You see, Dole can not salute with his right hand due to the injuries mentioned earlier.

Bob Dole paid the ultimate respect between two veterans, first by standing when it is nearly impossible for him to do at this point in his life, and then rendering a salute the only way possible – with his left hand.

This is a very proud moment in American history and a memory that I have that will last a lifetime.

Ed Boston

Bob Dole

 

 

Heroes Killed in Afghanistan Named

We would like to ask those who read this post here on EdBoston.com to join with us as we pray for the memory of these brave heroes as well as comfort for their families and loved ones.

 

US servicemen killed in Afghanistan bomb attack identified

The Pentagon on Wednesday released the names of three servicemen killed a day earlier in a roadside bomb attack in Afghanistan.

Army Capt. Andrew Patrick Ross, age 29, of Lexington, Virginia; Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Michael Emond, age 39, of Brush Prairie, Washington; and Air Force Staff Sgt. Dylan J. Elchin, age 25, of Hookstown, Pennsylvania. died of injuries sustained in the attack in Afghanistan’s central Ghazni Province, southwest of the capital, Kabul.

You can read the complete story by clicking on this FoxNews.com link.

Remains of U.S. Returned from North Korea

Pence at honorable carry ceremony: Our boys are coming home – Vice President Mike Pence represents the Trump administration at honorable carry ceremony for presumed remains of U.S. soldiers returned by North Korea.

The human remains returned to the U.S. by North Korea last week are “consistent with being Americans,” according to an official who saw the contents of the 55 boxes.

It’s too early to know how many people are inside the boxes, John E. Byrd, a government scientist who oversees the laboratory examining the remains, told reporters Thursday.

One dog tag from a U.S. Army soldier was among the recovered equipment, and two sons of the deceased soldier will receive the dog tag next week.

Most of the remains returned to the U.S. were from the village of Sinheung Ri, near the Chosin Reservoir. The site hosted a famous battle fought from November to December of 1950 during the Korean War.

Byrd added that of all the possibilities, what surprised him most “was the great care that the North Koreans, the KPA, soldiers took in packaging and preparing those remains to be handed over to us.”

“They had been very carefully packaged with padding and packaging that was done to, I think, a very high standard,” he said.

Read the rest of this story at FoxNews.com.

Flag Day 2018 and Happy Birthday U. S. Army

Today is Flag Day and the Birthday of the United States Army. Both topics are very special to us here at the Ed Boston Podcast Network.

The flag stands for what we believe in when it comes to the patriotism of the United States of America. While our relationship with our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ is at the very top of the priority list, the love we have for our great nation ranks very high on that list.

As a veteran of the U. S. Army, Pastor Ed is grateful for the time spent serving our country. Many of the things that he believes in and stands for can be traced back to his time in the Army as well as the Christian upbringing he received.

Below are descriptions of both Flag Day and the birthday of the Army from  NationalDayCalendar.com.

National-Flag-Day-June-14-1024x512

NATIONAL FLAG DAY

On June 14 we honor Old Glory on National Flag Day.  This day commemorates the adoption of the United States flag on June 14, 1777.

On National Flag Day, Americans show respect for the U.S. Flag and what it represents.  Representing independence and unity, the Star Spangled Banner has become a powerful symbol of Americanism and is flown proudly.

While Betsy Ross has been given credit for stitching together the first American flag, there isn’t any sound evidence supporting the story.  At the same time, there is any to disprove it, either.  During Ross’s Revolutionary time, several standards were carried bearing red and white stripes and varying symbols where the blue field and stars now reside.  Since 1777, the design of the flag has been officially modified 26 times.  For 47 years, the 48-star flag was in effect.  In 1959, the 49-star version became official on July 4.  President Eisenhower ordered the 50-star flag on August 21, 1959.

Seventeen-year-old Robert G. Heft of Ohio designed the 50-star American flag.  His was one f the more than 1,500 designs that were submitted to President Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

HOW TO OBSERVE

Many people have died protecting our country.  On National Flag Day, raise the flag and fly it proudly. Use #NationalFlagDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

On May 30, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation deeming June 14 as Flag Day.  President Wilson stated, “It is the anniversary of the day upon which the flag of the United States was adopted by the Congress as the emblem of the Union.” He also wrote, “On that day rededicate ourselves to the nation, ‘one and inseparable’ from which every thought that is not worthy of our fathers’ first vows in independence, liberty, and right shall be excluded and in which we shall stand with united hearts.”

Army-Birthday-June-14-1

ARMY BIRTHDAY

Every year on June 14, the United States Army celebrates its creation in 1775.

Formed from amateur troops of volunteer soldiers defending colonies against British tyranny, the oldest military force in the United States began before the U.S. formally existed. Their forces consisted of mostly inexperienced militiamen commanded by independent colonial armies. According to battlefields.org, there were never more than 48,000 Continental soldiers at one time. Today, the United States Army consists of over one million active duty service members and an additional 800,000 National Guard and Reserves members.

The enduring history of the U.S. Army means they have been integral to many of the United State’s military, peace-keeping and humanitarian efforts. During the Army’s Birthday, these and many advancements will be recognized through events and ceremonies.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Wish the Army a Happy Birthday and learn about the history of the oldest branch of the U.S. military. Use #ArmyBirthday to share on social media.

HISTORY

On June 14, 1775, the Second Continental Congress created a Continental Army of existing militias to protect the Northern colonies from British troops.

Remarks by President Trump at a Memorial Day Ceremony

Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, Virginia

11:47 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you very much, everyone.  Thank you very much.  What an honor.  Secretary Mattis —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  And I love you, too.  (Laughter.)  General Dunford, Joint Chiefs, members of the Armed Forces, members of the Cabinet, members of Congress, and distinguished guests: Thank you for joining us on this solemn day of remembrance.  We are gathered here on the sacred soil of Arlington National Cemetery to honor the lives and deeds of America’s greatest heroes: the men and women who laid down their lives for our freedom.  Today, we pay tribute to their service, we mourn alongside their families, and we strive to be worthy of their sacrifice.

The heroes who rest in these hallowed fields — in the cemeteries, battlefields, and burial grounds near and far — are drawn from the full tapestry of American life.  They came from every generation, from towering cities and windswept prairies, from privilege and from poverty.  They were generals and privates, captains and corporals, of every race, color, and of every creed.  But they were all brothers and sisters in arms.  And they were all united then, as they are united now forever, by their undying love of our great country.  (Applause.)

Theirs was a love more deep and more pure than most will ever know.  It was a love that willed them up mountains, through deserts, across oceans, and into enemy camps and unknown dangers.  They marched into hell so that America could know the blessings of peace.  They died so that freedom could live.

America’s legacy of service is exemplified by a World War II veteran who joins us today — Senator Bob Dole.  (Applause.)  Earlier this year, I was fortunate to present a very special award to Bob — the Congressional Gold Medal.  (Applause.)  Bob, thank you for honoring us with your presence, and thank you for your lifetime of service to our nation.

Today, we remember your fallen comrades who never returned home from that great struggle for freedom.

We are also proud to be in the company of another American hero — Navy veteran Ray Chavez.  (Applause.)  At 106 years of age — (applause) — and he was in the Oval Office two days ago, and he doesn’t look a day over 60 — (laughter) — he’s the oldest living survivor of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  (Applause.)  What a guy.  And, Ray, you are truly an inspiration to all who are here today and all of our great country.  Thank you, Ray, for being with us.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

Most importantly, we’re joined today by the families of the American heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice.  We cannot imagine the depth of emotion that this day brings each year — the grief renewed, the memories re-lived, those last beautiful moments together cherished and always remembered.  And you also feel that incredible pride — a pride shared by one really and truly grateful nation.  (Applause.)

To every parent who weeps for a child, to every child who mourns for a parent, and to every husband or wife whose heart has been torn in two: Today we ask God to comfort your pain, to ease your sorrow, and to wipe away your tears.  This is a very special day.  And today, our whole country thanks you, embraces you, and pledges to you: We will never forget our heroes.  (Applause.)

Joining us today is the family of Marine Lieutenant Colonel David Greene, who rests here at Arlington.  (Applause.)  Dave grew up in Upstate New York, dreaming of attending the United States Naval Academy.  In 1982, that dream came true.  Soon another dream came true when Dave met his eternal soulmate, Sarah, who is here with their two beautiful children, Jena and Wesley.  (Applause.)  He’s looking down on you right now.  You know that, right?  He’s looking down on you, and he’s so proud and happy.

After 10 years of service as a Marine helicopter pilot, Dave left active duty to spend more time with the people who truly filled his heart.  Those are the people you just met.  But Sarah knew the man she married — she knew he couldn’t live without serving.  Couldn’t do it.  So she suggested he join the services in the form of reserves, and that’s what he did.

In January 2004, Dave deployed to Iraq.  That summer, just a few weeks before he was scheduled to return home, he was called in to provide air support for ground troops who were in very serious danger.  They were in very serious trouble.  He immediately raced to the scene.  As he covered his troops, he was shot by ground fire, giving up his life for his comrades and his country.

Lieutenant Colonel Greene remains one of the highest-ranking Marines to have been killed in Iraq since 2003.  But for him, it was never about rank or title.  Like all of his fellow warriors, it was only about duty.  He served to defend our flag and our freedom.

And now his son Wesley, who is a senior at Liberty University, plans to follow in his father’s footsteps and join the military.  (Applause.)  Wesley, I just want to congratulate you and your entire family.  Great, great family.  Thank you very much, and thank you for being here with us.  (Applause.)  Thank you very much.  Beautiful.  You’re going to love the military.  These are incredible people.

We’re also honored to have with us today the family of Army Captain Mark Stubenhofer, and his wife Patty, and their children, Lauren, Justin, and Hope.  (Applause.)  Please.  Thank you for being with us.  Thank you very much.  Such an honor.

Mark grew up not far from here, in Springfield, Virginia. Every year, he visited these grounds and hoped to someday serve here as a member of that very, very famous Old Guard.

In 2004, Mark deployed to Iraq for the second time.  While he was there, Patty went into labor with their third child, and Mark was with her by phone when their beautiful baby girl was born.  Together, they named her Hope.

Just a few months later, Mark was on a mission near Baghdad when he was tragically slain by a sniper’s bullet.

Today, Hope is 13 years old.  Although she never had the chance to meet her great father, she can feel his love wrapped around her every single day.  And when Patty puts her children to bed, and kisses them goodnight, she can see Mark’s legacy beaming back at her through their bright and glowing eyes.  Thank you so much.  (Applause.)  Really beautiful.  Thank you.  You know that, right?

Also joining us today is a very special friend: Seven-year-old Christian Jacobs, who is here with his mom Brittany.

I met Christian exactly one year ago today.  Last year, after the wreath-laying ceremony, Christian walked over to me with great confidence, shook my hand, looked me straight in the eye, and asked if I would like to meet his dad.  He loved his dad — Marine Sergeant Christopher Jacobs, who died when Christian was just eight months old.

Next, Christian, looking as sharp as you could look dressed in a beautiful Marine outfit — I’ve never seen a Marine look that good in my life, Christian.  (Applause.)  He wanted to look good, he told me, as a tribute to his father.  And he led me to his dad’s grave, and we paid our respects together.  It was a moment I will always remember.

Christian, I want you to know that even though your father has left this world — he’s left it for the next — but he’s not gone.  He’ll never be gone.  Your dad’s love, courage, and strength live in you, Christian.  And as you grow bigger and stronger, just like him, so too does your father’s incredible legacy.  So thank you both.  That’s so beautiful.  Thank you.  (Applause.)  Thank you.  Thank you, Christian.  Good to see you.  He’s become my friend, I will tell you.  Special young man.

To every family member of the fallen, I want you to know that the legacy of those you lost does not fade with time, but grows only more powerful.  Their legacy does not, like a voice in the distance, become a faint echo.  But, instead, their legacy grows deeper, spreading further, touching more lives, reaching down through time and out across many generations.  Through their sacrifice, your loved ones have achieved something very, very special: immortality.

Today we also remember the more than 82,000 American servicemen and women who remain missing from wars and conflicts fought over the past century.  We will never stop searching for them.  (Applause.)  And whenever possible, we will bring them home.  We pledge to remember not just on Memorial Day.  We will always remember them.  We will remember them every day.

Moments ago, I laid a wreath in tribute to those resting “in honored glory.”  For more than 80 years, the Sentinels of the Old Guard have kept watch over the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.  Serving in this elite unit is among the most prestigious honors in the United States military.  While the rest of us sleep, while we go about our lives, through every minute, through every day, through freezing cold, scorching heat, and raging storms, they stand watch.

Even when the Earth shook beneath their feet on 9/11, and smoke from the Pentagon darkened the sky above these tree-lined hills, here they remained, faithful at their post, eternal on guard.  They never moved.

The Sentinel always stands, because America never forgets it’s our heroes who make us who we are and who determine what we will be.  (Applause.)

Our fallen heroes have not only written our history — they’ve shaped our destiny.  They saved the lives of the men and women with whom they served.  They cared for their families more than anything in the world.  They love their families.  They inspired their communities, uplifted their country, and provided the best example of courage, virtue, and valor the world will ever know.  They fought and bled and died so that America would forever remain safe and strong and free.

Each of the markers on that field — each of the names engraved in stone — teach us what it means to be loyal and faithful and proud and brave and righteous and true.

That is why we come to this most sacred place.  That is why we guard these grounds with absolute devotion.  That is why we always will remember.  Because here — on this soil, on these grounds, beneath those fields — lies the true source of American greatness, of American glory, and of American freedom.

As long as we are blessed with patriots such as these, we shall forever remain one people, one family, and one nation under God.  (Applause.)

It’s been my great honor to be with you today.  I want to thank you.  May God bless the families of the fallen.  May God bless the men and women who serve.  And may God bless the United States of America — our great country.  Thank you.  (Applause.)  Thank you very much.

END

12:08 P.M. EDT

Negotiate From A Position of Power

Back on April 27th, in a post titled “Will There Be A Peace Treaty?” I called President Donald Trump a master negotiator. The President’s letter below shows his negotiating ability and when you negotiate from a position of power, you have a much better chance of things working out in your way.

If you disagree, I would suggest you look at the skills President Ronald Reagan had with this topic. His negotiating ability from a position of power was unparalleled during my lifetime.

Less than a day after this letter was sent, North Korea was back asking for the negotiations to continue. Call a bullies bluff and most bullies will back down.

Letter-to-Kim-Jung-Un

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Today is Military Spouse Appreciation Day it is celebrated on the Friday before Mother’s Day every year in the United States. President Ronald Reagan recognized the importance of this day when it started in 1984. Many United States citizens take this day to acknowledge the significant contributions, support, and sacrifices of spouses of their Armed Forces. Each year, the US President normally commemorates this day with a ceremonial speech and proclamation.

Breaking News: North Korea To Suspend Missle Testing and Closing A Nuclear Test Site

In a stunning announcement today, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un seems to cave to international pressure in regards to its nuclear program, just days before a scheduled meeting with American President Donald Trump.

We’ll have to see how good the word of “Rocket Man” really is.

Below is the beginning of a story from Fox News, click the headline link below to read the entire story.

———-

North Korea announces end to missile testing as Trump cites ‘big progress’

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un announced Friday that his country will be suspending missile testing and closing a nuclear test site, several reports said.

“From April 21, North Korea will stop nuclear tests and launches of intercontinental ballistic missiles,” the Korean Central News Agency said, according to Yonhap News. “The North will shut down a nuclear test site in the country’s northern side to prove the vow to suspend nuclear test.”

The announcement comes amid preparations for a meeting later this year between President Trump and the North Korean dictator. During the summit, Trump said he expected to talk with Kim about denuclearizing the hermit kingdom.